Sunday, March 06, 2005

Half Way to Uncrosseyed (qbdp # 43.5)

Jassy Lupa received from me a card illustrated with my regular mailart fare, a fidgetglyph, but she doesn't quite seem to get it, so she sent me this little memorilization of her efforts to understand it and my effort to create it:


Jassy Lupa, "qbdp # 43.5" (15 Feb 2005)

Be sure to note the bold "NO!" on the lower edge. Jassy also marked the card with "Room 115" (the room Nancy and I were staying in when I created the card) and a drawing of pie a la mode (theoretically, invented by the hotel we were in at the time).

un violon d'ingres

12 comments:

kiyotei said...

Yes-

It's a puzzler alrighty!
I fidgetted the "floor" okay and possibly "Shift" . . .
beyond that I'm bamboozled.

Great Cryptopost my friend.

take care - bon jour

Geof Huth said...

kiyotei,

And figuring out the words is only the first step! Jassy's version of my piece is beautiful, better than mine, but she leaves out part of one letter in the southeast quadrant of the piece. See the original for help.

Geof

kiyotei said...

Ahh yes . . .

The missing "O" -

But sihoot means nothing to me.

Roger... Cracker Jack, Over and Out.

kiyotei said...

Doh!

PART OF ONE letter.

"I see" said the blind man.

Cool- I got all the words, so I'll work on my second step now.
Thanks for the hint.

Geof Huth said...

kiyotei,

Hey, illumination may be what we need, but your "sihoot" line was a hoot! Thanks for the fun. And glad you worked it out.

Geof

jassy lupa said...

Geof - I have been thick and rude! Just exactly like all those people we really don't like too much. I had no idea that you could figure your word illustrations out like a puzzle?! I hope that in good fun you understand my silly responses. I don't want to be left out of your next mailing - I really don't! I think I need a little more help though in understanding - or perhaps it is better to just be baffled and stupid and respond from the gut???? Let me know. [And by the way - thank you for your input on Ruud's blog, I appreciate your words and understanding.]

Geof Huth said...

Jassy,

Wow, no need to apologize. I thought your response was fun. And, hey, the work isn't obvious right off the back; it takes a while to get used to such craziness. No problem here, and I never thought you rude.

Whoa, I sure wouldn't leave you out of the mailing for sending a fun response to my piece!

You can be baffled or ask or work through these. Maybe after seeing a few they'll start to make more sense. But this kind of "writing" always leads to confusion, questions, and--hopefully, at least,--insight.

By the way, I haven't seen "How to Draw a Bunny." It showed in this area for one night, and I was leaving town that day!

Geof

jassy lupa said...

Thanks for returned kindness. I'll certainly keep an open mind and always keep it FUN. That is the bottom line, for me anyway.

You may really like How to Draw a Bunny. I sure did. I wasn't expecting anything, just clicking around the channels and found it! WOW! I was very inspired by it and sat down a couple hours later and did two paintings.

Geof Huth said...

Jassy,

"How to Draw a Bunny" was okay, pretty good, but not as good as I'd hoped. Maybe I just know too much about Ray Johnson. Still, hearing and seeing him, and hearing those who knew him talk about him, was pretty interesting. And lots of shots of him and his homes, which was great. I'm trying to keep my house from being quite was his last home was like!

The credits have just ended.

Oh, so how come I'm talking about the film right now? Well, because after reading your last comment, I decided to check the library catalog online, and I discovered that they had a copy. So I rushed out of the house, with 16 minutes to spare, and picked up the DVD.

I know I'm not giving this a rave review, but the last biographical film I saw about an artist was the shockingly beautiful (and revelatory, to me) film "River and Tides: Andy Goldsworthy Working in Time." So maybe my standards are too high.

For instance, the cinematography isn't as fine in "How to Draw a Bunny." But, yes, some great artwork of Ray's in the film

I'm watching the outtakes now!

Thanks for the suggestion!

Geof

jassy lupa said...

Glad you got to see How To Draw A Bunny and sorry it was disappointing for you. I actually liked it better then the Andy Goldsworthy film. Now we really know that our tastes are dissimilar!

I think what I liked about it is that I learned something about the quote "founder of mailart" and because I happen to be obsessed with that particular topic - anything would make me ecstatic!

I hesitate to tell people about a fabulous movie - it always sets them up with big expectations. Have you ever noticed that? I did like the movie Crumb, I thought that was done well.

Okay - I am going to have to get the DVD so I can watch the outtakes! I'll bet Ray was an uncomfortable person to know.

Geof Huth said...

Jassy,

No problem with my disappointmet. I just didn't think it was a good piece of filmmaking, tho the subject still interested me. The film itself also didn't focus much on mailart, which was a surprise to me.

The best part of the movie to me was not part of the movie. They did a tiny piece on the Ray Johnson retrospective exhibition that took place a few months after his death. In this short piece, we were best introduced to the breadth of Johnson's art, and to the beauty of it. That is well worth your time. (Well, or I assume!)

I liked the Goldsworthy film better because it was a sophisticated piece of filmmaking that made connections beyond the work of the artist himself. The film itself was a piece of art in a way I didn't see with "How to Draw a Bunny." Also, I think that film did a much better job highlighting the art. And I knew nothing about Goldsworthy's work, so everything was a revelation to me. With Johnson's work, very little was a revelation.

Both films, strangely enough, but expectedly enough, showed the artists as people who didn't quite fit with the rest of the world. Less so with Goldsworthy, tho in some ways I think he has a harder time fitting in with the world. He couldn't even function within the bounds of his own family! (Being a family man, this was the most revelatory part of the film.)

And, Jassy, I really appreciate your mentioning the film, because without that push I might not have remembered to look it up at the library! And I think it was well worth my tiem.

Our tastes aren't that different. "Crumb" is actually one of my favorite movies of all time. An incredible and disturbing piece of biography. Real insights into the man. And a real piece of art itself.

Thanks!

Geof

jassy lupa said...

Several days later - and I am just peeking out from having my grand baby here all to myself, no parents!

Yeah, you are right, the Crumb doc was very well done. Do you have any other suggestions on where I can learn or see more about Ray Johnson and mailart? Any books? I read around on the internet, and gradually I am picking up a little bit.